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Counseling and Therapy

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Interlibrary Loan

Interlibrary Loan (ILL) is a  free service available to the Manhattan College community.

         When the library does not have a book or an article you need, you can request the item(s) through ILL.

  1. Only print books can be requested through ILL. 
  2. Allow two weeks (business days) for book requests.
  3. Articles requests usually are faster.
  4. Allow 5-6 days for article requests.
  5. Articles are sent to the email you provide.

 

Citation Mining

If you have a citation and want to find the full-text article, this is the easiest way to do so:

  • Identify the journal title and publication year.
  • Go to the library’s Journal List and type the journal title.
  • A list of databases will appear where you can locate the journal, followed by a date range.
  • Select the date range that includes your specific article and click on that database.
  • You will be brought directly to a listing of years available for the journal.
  • Select the year, volume & issue of your citation.
 

Reading Academic Articles

        Reading scholarly articles is challenging.  Follow these tips as you peruse your articles.

  1. Examine the structure and format of the article.
  2. Most scholarly, peer-reviewed articles have the same or similar structure.
  3. Many contain data and findings.

-- Abstract (summary of the whole article

-- Introduction (why they did the research)
-- Methodology (how they did the research)
-- Results (what happened; identify the findings)
-- Discussion (what the results mean)
-- Conclusion (what they learned)
-- References (whose research they read)

  • Read the abstract and conclusion first, as these have the main points.
  • Read the discussion next. This will give you a longer report on the findings and their implications.
  • At this point, if you're sure the article has what you need, start at the beginning and read the whole thing through, taking notes as you go.

Class Presentations (Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018)